Jackson's Story

Jackson's Story

On the 19th of May, Jackson Otingehwiny was released after serving an eight year prison sentence. During his time in Luzira Maximum Prison, Uganda, he was determined to develop himself through education; enabling a positive transformation during his prison experience.

Introducing the secondees

Introducing the secondees

On Saturday, April 1st 2017, two senior prison officers from the Kenya Prison Service arrived at Heathrow early in the morning after a long flight from Nairobi to London. With funding from the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission, APP is supporting the Kenyan delegates in the UK for a three months Secondment Programme, during which time they will learn about the British criminal justice system and gain important exposure experiences in British prisons.

World Health Day: Coping with Depression in Prison

World Health Day:                            Coping with Depression in Prison

Depression: Let’s Talk! This is the theme for World Health Day this year which is commemorated on 7th April. At least once, prisoners will experience depression at different levels of severity. In line with the theme for this year’s World Health Day, some of the beneficiaries used these initiatives as a platform to talk about their life in prison and how these initiatives have helped them cope with depression.

Michael Irungu: a story of loss and gain

Michael Irungu: a story of loss and gain

Michael Irungu’s perspectives could not have been better.

Where half of Kenya’s population live below the poverty line, being born into a wealthy family has its perks. After finishing primary school, Michael had the chance to visit Alliance High School, one of the prestigious secondary schools in Kenya. Despite this, Michael would never gain the Kenya Certificate of Secondary Education from this nor from another high school. Bad company forces Michael to lose his way.

I made 44 friends in Kenya’s prisons and they taught me more than I taught them

I made 44 friends in Kenya’s prisons and they taught me more than I taught them

When I arrived in Nairobi on New Year’s Eve in 2015, I didn’t know what to expect. A city I had never visited before or had any familiarity to was going to be my home for a year. Its people, unpredictable weather, public transportation and food were all very foreign to me. All I knew was that I had come to teach law in Kenya’s prisons. This was a bit much for my family to process who were in denial of my endeavours until the night they bade me farewell at the airport.